Posts Tagged ‘WPT’

Thoughts on the WPT Championship [Article]

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

[Scotty Nguyen, born October 28, 1962 in Nha Trang, Vietnam is a Vietnamese American professional poker player who is a five time World Series of Poker (WSOP) bracelet winner, most notably as the winner of the 1998 World Series of Poker Main Event and the 2008 WSOP $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. World Championship. This win also made him the first and currently only player to win both the WSOP Main Event and $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. events.]


For those that do not know, this was my second year in a row making a deep run in the World Poker Tour Championship at the Bellagio, finishing 6th place last year and now 8th place in this year’s event. I came into the event this year just knowing it would take a lot to throw me off my path of winning for my fans and family.


I’d like to tell you about my thought process in my elimination hand because it had many different elements to it: With blinds at 40,000-80,000, and a 10,000 ante, I raised from middle position to 260,000, and David Benyamine called from the big blind. We both checked to the turn on a board of Jh, 10d, 6d, 8h, David bet 350,000, I raised to 1,150,000, and David moved all-in. I called with 8-8 for a set of eights, but David showed 10-10 for a higher set, and I needed to catch the case eight on the river to stay alive. The last card was the 7d, and David won the pot with his set of tens to eliminate me from the tournament in 8th place.


Now the first factor to consider is that David called my raise from the big blind. Because he already has some money invested, David might be calling to defend his blind, to see a discounted flop with a variety of marginal hands, or he might have an actual hand like a pair or big cards. A call with a real hand here likely means he wants to control the pot as best he can out of position. Now when David checks on the Jh-10d-6d flop, I consider putting in a continuation bet, but I decided that a check would be better.


With so many draws out there, betting could only build up a bigger pot if he has anything, as he would have to re-raise to protect from the draws. I wanted to keep the pot small even if I had the best hand since my hand was vulnerable at this point, so I checked as well. Now that turn card, 8h, is gin for my hand as it gave me a set and didn’t complete the flush draw on board. The 8h did complete a straight on board, however David would’ve had to played gap cards like Q-9 or 7-9 out of position and I just didn’t put him on that type of hand.


When David bets into me on the turn, it can mean many things. David could’ve checked a hand like J-10 on the flop with the intent of check raising, expecting me to bet any overpair to protect against the flush draw. David could have pocket 9’s or 9-10 for a pair and draw, and decided that here is the time to find out if it is good or not.


David could also hold two diamonds and want to bet to decide the price of seeing the river, instead of checking and allowing me to bet and decide the stakes myself. Finally, David could have 6-6, 10-10, or J-J. I raised to $1.15 million here because I need David to know that he cannot draw cheaply, and I want him to pay if he has a flush or straight draw. David would have had less than $1.5 million behind if he calls. When David moves all in over the top of me, I thought for a couple minutes.


There are three problems with David moving in here – the board texture, my stack size and my image. Because the board texture is so draw heavy, it makes sense for David to try and push me off my hand here with a draw, which makes it hard for me to fold a strong hand like trip 8’s. David also knew that if he pushed all in, I would be put to a decision for my tournament life. If I call and lose, I am out, so he could be using this bet as a power play to make me fold an overpair, an A-J, or any hand that might be marginal in this spot.


Finally, I had been playing good, solid poker all day, and David could shove knowing that I would only call with an absolute monster hand. With less than $1.8 million to call and around $4.5 million already in the pot, I was getting better than 2-1 in this hand to call, and this, coupled with every other factor prompted me to call. As you can see, there were a lot of layers to this hand, and many factors that led me to ultimately calling.


It was unfortunate that the hand played out this way and I am disappointed as I am anytime I come so close.


However, I will be back next tournament playing harder than ever to improve on my finish in this tournament baby!


Get your $600 poker bonus here baby!



WPT at the Bellagio with Scotty Nguyen

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

For those that do not know, this was my second year in a row making a deep run in the World Poker Tour Championship at the Bellagio, finishing 6th place last year and now 8th place in this year’s event. I came into the event this year just knowing it would take a lot to throw me off my path of winning for my fans and family. I’d like to tell you about my thought process in my elimination hand because it had many different elements to it:


With blinds at 40,000-80,000, and a 10,000 ante, I raised from middle position to 260,000, and David Benyamine called from the big blind. We both checked to the turn on a board of Jh, 10d, 6d, 8h, David bet 350,000, I raised to 1,150,000, and David moved all-in. I called with 8-8 for a set of eights, but David showed 10-10 for a higher set, and I needed to catch the case eight on the river to stay alive. The last card was the 7d, and David won the pot with his set of tens to eliminate me from the tournament in 8th place.


Now the first factor to consider is that David called my raise from the big blind. Because he already has some money invested, David might be calling to defend his blind, to see a discounted flop with a variety of marginal hands, or he might have an actual hand like a pair or big cards. A call with a real hand here likely means he wants to control the pot as best he can out of position.


Now when David checks on the Jh-10d-6d flop, I consider putting in a continuation bet, but I decided that a check would be better. With so many draws out there, betting could only build up a bigger pot if he has anything, as he would have to re-raise to protect from the draws. I wanted to keep the pot small even if I had the best hand since my hand was vulnerable at this point, so I checked as well.


Now that turn card, 8h, is gin for my hand as it gave me a set and didn’t complete the flush draw on board. The 8h did complete a straight on board, however David would’ve had to played gap cards like Q-9 or 7-9 out of position and I just didn’t put him on that type of hand.


When David bets into me on the turn, it can mean many things. David could’ve checked a hand like J-10 on the flop with the intent of check raising, expecting me to bet any overpair to protect against the flush draw. David could have pocket 9’s or 9-10 for a pair and draw, and decided that here is the time to find out if it is good or not. David could also hold two diamonds and want to bet to decide the price of seeing the river, instead of checking and allowing me to bet and decide the stakes myself. Finally, David could have 6-6, 10-10, or J-J.


I raised to $1.15 million here because I need David to know that he cannot draw cheaply, and I want him to pay if he has a flush or straight draw. David would have had less than $1.5 million behind if he calls.


When David moves all in over the top of me, I thought for a couple minutes. There are three problems with David moving in here – the board texture, my stack size and my image. Because the board texture is so draw heavy, it makes sense for David to try and push me off my hand here with a draw, which makes it hard for me to fold a strong hand like trip 8’s. David also knew that if he pushed all in, I would be put to a decision for my tournament life. If I call and lose, I am out, so he could be using this bet as a power play to make me fold an overpair, an A-J, or any hand that might be marginal in this spot. Finally, I had been playing good, solid poker all day, and David could shove knowing that I would only call with an absolute monster hand. With less than $1.8 million to call and around $4.5 million already in the pot, I was getting better than 2-1 in this hand to call, and this, coupled with every other factor prompted me to call.


As you can see, there were a lot of layers to this hand, and many factors that led me to ultimately calling. It was unfortunate that the hand played out this way and I am disappointed as I am anytime I come so close. However, I will be back next tournament playing harder than ever to improve on my finish in this tournament baby!


- Scotty Nguyen, Expekt.com



Scotty Nguyen finished eight in last week’s WPT World Championship

Monday, April 26th, 2010

Scotty Nguyen finished eight in last week’s WPT World Championship and is full of confidence ahead of the WSOP in Las Vegas which is the next big event for the poker legend.


- I feel much better this year compared to 2009 and I will be there at the tables to beat them in the WSOP baby, says Scotty. The Expekt.com poker ambassador was one of the main title contenders with ten players to go in the WPT World Championship at Bellagio.


- Everything felt right during the first five days and I was really gunning for the title, recalls world champion Scotty.


Scotty did an amazing run among the 196 players in the massive $25,000 buy-in tournament and had even the WPT Player of the Year Award in his hand if he would have won the title, but he finally busted against Daviud Benyamine with a set of eights against a set of tens.


- At that moment I felt bitterly disappointed, but looking back at the tournament, and also the spring overall, all feels very good for me at the tables now.


- Afterwards I went home and worked in the yard, it wore me out and made me happy again; I got other things on my mind.


This weekend, the online finals in the Scotty Boot Camp are held at Expekt.com were the lucky winners who will go to Las Vegas at the end of May, for an exclusive poker boot camp with Scotty and Expekt.com, will be picked.


At the end, David Williams won the WPT World Championship and bagged $1,5m. Scotty Nguyen cashed $105,823.


Scotty Nguyen in the WPT


WPT World Championship, Scotty Nguyen is second ahead of today’s dramatic showdown

Friday, April 23rd, 2010

Scotty Nguyen has had a successful spring, and this week he has been red-hot at Bellagio in Las Vegas among the heavyweight elite of the WPT World Championship.


Going into day 5 on Thursday in the WTP World Championship, with 941,000 in chips, Scotty ended the day with 2,637,000 in chips and is second among the ten remaining players. The key hand for the Expekt.com ambassador was when he doubled his chip count with a set of nines against David Williams.” I got some good hands and it was just nice to play. Now my first goal is to reach the last 6 and the final table in a good position and then I will be eying the title”, says Scotty.


If Scotty wins the WPT World Championship, he will become the WPT Player of the Year, having won most race points during the WPT season. Shawn Buchanan and Phil Hellmuth also have that chance, with former total leaders Faraz Jaka and Olivier Buzquet busting earlier in the WPT World Championship.


Scotty has made eight WPT final tables during his career, and he has won more than $12m in prize money in live tournaments in total. The winner in the WPT World Championship grabs $1,5m, while the runner-up cashes $1m. “This will be a truly exciting Friday, and I am eying the title now baby”, says Scotty.


Earlier this year, Scotty reached the final table in the WPT Doyle Brunson Classic, and he finished third in the NBC Heads-Up Championship after doing an amazing turnaround against Phil Ivey. Scotty was down to 2,600 of a total of 80,000 chips when he did is own Houdini trick and won. He finished third in that tournament.


At the end of May, Scotty and Expekt.com are arranging Scotty’s Boot Camp in Las Vegas where ten lucky Expekt.com customers will get exclusive poker lessons from the world champion. One easy way of getting a ticket to Boot Camp is to join Scotty’s photo contest, but hurry up, last day is today!


Final 10 standing WPT World Championship before tonight’s final play that resumes 21.00 CET at the Bellagio casino:


1. John O´Shea – 3,174,000

2. Scotty Nguyen, Expekt.com – 2,637,000

3. David Benyamine – 2,561,000

4. David Williams – 2,549,000

5. Billy Baxter – 2,429,000

6. Eric Baldwin – 2,130,000

7. Cliff Josephy – 1,269,000

8. Shawn Buchanan – 1,087,000

9. Nikolay Evdakov – 922,000

10. Phil Hellmuth – 839,000


Try Poker at Expekt here!


Scotty Nguyen in the WPT


Scotty Nguyen WPT World Championship update

Thursday, April 22nd, 2010

Scotty Nguyen is in fine form and is one of 18 players out of 195 starting in the WPT World Championship at Bellagio in Las Vegas.


- Everything feels just fine and I aim to reach the final table, says Scotty. World champion and poker legend Scotty Nguyen is in the middle of the remaining field with 941,000 chips.


- I have a good feeling for this and have been playing well this spring, continues Scotty, who has played steadily all four days with the other poker super-stars at Bellagio.


Expekt.com ambassador Scotty is guaranteed $47,000 in the $25,000 buy-in tournament and play resumes at 21.00 CET this Thursday when the 18 contenders will play their way down to the final table.


Here are the remaining players’ counts:


Table 1

1. Eric Baldwin – 880,000

2. Shawn Buchanan – 1,224,000

3. John O’Shea – 495,000

4. J.J. Liu – 674,000

5. David Benyamine – 2,350,000

6. Phil Hellmuth – 1,377,000

7. Cliff Josephy – 458,000

8. Scotty Nguyen, Expekt.com – 941,000

9. Olivier Busquet – 1,088,000


Table 2

1. Nikolay Evdakov – 1,426,000

2. Robert Cooper – 662,000

3. David Williams – 2,072,000

4. Jason Lester – 421,000

5. Josh Arieh – 303,000

6. Billy Baxter – 1,630,000

7. Faraz Jaka – 3,117,000

8. Tony Cousineau – 60,000

9. Matt Stout – 274,000


Try Expekt.com poker here!


Scotty Nguyen Expekt.com


Scotty aiming to defend his title in the LA Poker Classic $10 horse event

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Scotty Nguyen, the poker ambassador of Expekt.com, is focused on winning and defending his title in the LA Poker Classic WPT 2010 coming up next week. Follow Scotty on Twitter and Facebook to get the latest news.



We had Scotty Nguyen on the phone from Las Vegas looking back at 2009

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

Poker legend Scotty Nguyen finished 2009 on a high when he reached the final table in the WPT Doyle Brunson Classic in Las Vegas cashing $250,000 just before Christmas.


- It was nice to end the year with a good run. My big goal for 2010 will be to win an EPT tournament, the only title I don’t have, says Scotty, poker ambassador for Expekt.com.


Scotty Nguyen has won almost everything you can wish for as a poker player in his long and illustrious career. Scotty Nguyen became World Champion back in 1998 when he won the WSOP Main Event. He is currently the only player in the world who has won both the WSOP Main Event and the $50 000 WSOP H.O.R.S.E event. He won the massive H.O.R.S.E title in 2008, a title by many viewed to prove whom is the best all round player on the planet with the huge buy-in and challenging structure. All together he has cashed $11 million in tournament winnings.


Scotty says:


- Whatever you win as a poker player, the Main Event in WSOP is the biggest title you can win. It does not compare to anything and it is a title that all poker players aim for, to be the world champion.


Can you win it again?


- Of course I can. I came close in 2007 when I was chip leader with 13 players of 6 000 left. It still hunts me that I didn’t win it for a second time, but it also drives me on to reach that dream again.


Scotty swooped the World Series of Poker in 2007, boasting six tournament cashes, two final tables, and that near repeat performance of his 1998 Main Event victory.


We called up the poker legend in his beloved Las Vegas and had a chat about life and poker looking back, and ahead to 2010.


Will you always live in Las Vegas, Scotty?


- Does the pope have a funny hat, baby? It was Las Vegas who made me who I am. It shaped my life when I came from Asia and it is a city to cherish and respect for me and my family. I will always love and live in Las Vegas.


Your family and wife Julie means a lot to you?


- Julie is my rock in life. She is my biggest support and biggest love. I am blessed in that way, baby. I think 80 percent of all top poker players is divorced. The reason might be that too many just have poker on their mind. No wonder that the wife gets sick of listening to bad beats and good beats night and day.


- I don’t even have a deck of cards in my house! When I come home from work I am only two things; a husband and a father. I relax when I have my family around me and I play with the kids, cook food, chill out and take care of my garden with all the flowers.


Still, will your kids be poker players you reckon?


- No. I want them to study and play sports. I really try to steer my kids into sports, basketball for example. I love sports myself, basketball, boxing, soccer. At home I watch a lot of sports and nature and animal programs, but never the poker channels. What would you have done if you hadn’t been a poker player?


- I am poker through and through and will play until my last day or at least as long as my hands work. But if not, I would have come up with some way to make money and support my family. I learned that in Vietnam, starting to play poker in the streets as a seven-year old. My mum never had to buy me anything; I bought my own clothes, food and books for school.


- I also did a lot of trading in the military camps. I bought sweets and cigarettes for 50 cents and sold it for 1 dollar. I have always been like that, finding a way to do money. – Then, later on, when my mum come to Las Vegas for the first time and a stranger stopped us at the street and asked for my autograph, she started to cry. She was proud. She knew her little son had made it.


You were in Europe a lot last year with Expekt.com. What did you think about that?


- I loved Europe, especially Budapest. It was a great city and I hope to come back there. I never seen my wife Julie photograph so much as she did there. She had the camera in her hand all the time. I also liked the clean air in Stockholm and the buzz in Barcelona. But you struggled in the tournaments?


- I am not at all pleased with my results from WSOP and onward, until my fifth place in Doyle Brunson Classic in Bellagio before Christmas. At WSOP everyone was talking about my goal to win $4 million and it affected my play and concentration.


- In Bellagio, I was back on track. I was short-stacked with 15 players left but wasn’t that worried. Daniel Negreanu always says that he never worries about me when I am short-stacked because I am at my best then. Some say I am the best short-stacked player on the planet and I think I showed that in Bellagio. The other players fear me when I am short-stacked, baby.


Going back to Europe, what do you think about the players here?


- I admire the attitude among the top European players. In US, so many players just think about surviving until the next day. European players come out to play and they attack. I see a younger me in some of the younger European players I met. They fear nobody and really have attitude. Some of them even intimidate me.


What are your big goals as an Expekt.com player in 2010?


- WSOP will be better this year for sure. But my big goal is to claim an EPT title. It is the only title I lack in my career. I will do also my best to learn the players more about poker in my columns at expekt.com and the fans can also follow me on Twitter and my Facebook fan page. Together with Expekt.com I will as well do a very special promotion in 2010 during the spring, but I will get back to that. Sounds interesting, baby.


We can look ahead to a new and exciting poker year. With Scotty Nguyen onboard planet poker, you feel that anything can happen.